Tag Archives: review

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (SPOILERS)

***If you care about Star Wars: The Last Jedi spoilersdo not continue reading until you see the movie! ** Then, of course, by all means, read on and discuss your opinions about the movie in the comments below!


So the fiancee pointed out to me that the Rotten Tomatoes ratings for Star Wars: The Last Jedi keeps dropping! Hah! I can kind of guess why! And it has to to with one little thing: Rey’s parentage.

Now, hear me out. I’m not saying the latest Star Wars movie is horrible–it’s actually pretty good–but there’s one scene that my inner writer keeps nagging about, and it has to do with one lovely tool: CONTINUITY.

God, I cannot tell you how much I despise continuity errors. Especially those, I think, that mess up the story line in favor of the director’s personal bias. According to my fiancee, who is usually on to something, (You’re welcome for that shout out, dear!) Rian Johnson tends to aim away from legacies and lineage in his stories. Now, I’m not going to say that’s 100% the case, because, as humans, we tend to oversimplify things. But I definitely think it’s not helping Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

*MAJOR SPOILER* 

About halfway through the movie, Rey “finds out” who were parents were from Kylo Ren himself. (I say “finds out” because there’s still a little part of me that thinks Kylo is lying, even if Ryan Johnson says he isn’t. “He believes it’s the truth,” is his exact quote.) Rey’s parents are–duh, duh, duhhh–“Nobodies.”

Plot twist of all plot twists!! And I’m completely torn about it!

I mean, it’s kind of cool that The Last Jedi apparently cancels out that Jedis can come from a specific line; that anyone can become a Jedi! It’s something that gives every Star Wars fan hope: that even the lowest person out there can develop superpowers!

But wait–hang on–this puts a severe dent in Star Wars’s continuity. What about that stuff regarding the midichlorians in the prequels? Midichlorians only come through specific bloodlines. It’s the reason why the original trilogy only lets Luke and Leia have powers; because they’re Anakin’s children.

So how can Rey have superpowers, if her parents were nobodies; junk traders who sold her for a bit of drink money?

Now I have full faith in the Star Wars franchise. Star Wars doesn’t deliver something so simple with a question this big. Really, I don’t think Rey’s parents were really nobodies. I think there’s more to the story. On a basic level, her parents being junk traders is too simple an answer; frankly, if it is the truth, I would be really upset, because I’d feel like the writers and Johnson didn’t really give it too much thought and just caved. And, from the backlash that has cried out over the internet, I bet a lot of you fellow Star Wars fans are feeling the same way.

Me? I’m still hoping Rey is a Kenobi. Maybe she’s a grandchild of old Ben.

What are your theories about Rey’s parentage in Star Wars: The Last Jedi? Do you think her parents really are junk traders? Or are the movies trying to build up to something?

Comment below!

Dual Wield Review: Everest + The Intern

This weekend I saw two movies that were phenomenal in their own ways. Everest and The Intern. I’ll admit: I had been more anxious to see Everest than The Intern. However, both entertained and spoke of values that we, as human beings all, identify with.

Everest 

Take a look at Everest’s trailer here:

“You, my friends, are following in the very footsteps of history. Something beyond the power of words to describe.”

– Rob Hall

These first words in the trailers set the tone of the movie beautifully. Everest is based on the true story of the 1996 Mount Everest Disaster. Now, I remember hearing about this catastrophe around the time that it happened. I don’t remember exactly when that was, I only remember my seven year old reaction: “I’m never climbing Mount Everest.”

Basically, the disaster goes as follows: on May 10-11, 1996, Everest was full of climbers — numerous teams and some solo adventurers– all attempting to reach her summit. A fast moving blizzard surprised all of these mountaineers… and eight people lost their lives. To date, it’s one of the worst disasters ever recorded on the mountain, only surpassed by 2014’s 16 fatalities and 2015’s 18 — both from avalanches.

The movie itself caught my attention this summer. It looked like a good action movie. I completely forgot that it was based off of a true story. I just wanted to see a movie about travel, adventure, and pushing yourself to the limit. All of these themes are present in the movie. However, it strikes harder and deeper than one would expect. Maybe it’s the added element that these people existed that makes the move stick in our minds. I think that it’s definitely a strong draw.

Everest, in its way, reminds me of Titanic. Minus the Jack and Rose plot, the actual historical context of the movie is fairly accurate… and definitely hits where it hurts. That’s the reason why I’ve watched the movie so often. Not because of the romance, but the disaster, and seeing people fight for their lives. That’s the reason why I enjoy action and suspense stories, in fact: the fight for survival.

Everest is all about extreme survival. Climbers trapped in harsh conditions. Some choose to let go, others fight for as long as they can — some survive, some don’t.

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When Everest first came out, I saw a few critics giving negative reviews. Their reason? “It has no plot!” I strongly beg to differ. What critics see as a lack of plot, I see as an effort to make a movies as real as possible. For Hollywood standards, Everest did a heck of a job. They successfully made a movie, respecting the memories of these amazing adventurers. Heck, the director took the cast and crew to the base of the Himalayas, hired a professional climber, and actually filmed the whole movie on a neighboring mountain.

When I see filmmakers make an effort to tell a good story (especially if it’s based off of a true story), I admire them. So, Everest is very worthwhile to see just for that reason: it’s real.

Warning: There are graphic moments in Everest; the filmmakers respectfully show the effects of climbing the world’s tallest mountain. A man vomits blood. People freeze to death. It’s highly emotional and real, like I said. Some things are hard to watch. So be prepared for that.


The Intern

Now, for a change of mood.

Take a look at The Intern’s trailer:

For those who are in need of inspirational life-stories, The Intern is a rollicking ride. It reminds me of my favorite dramedies like Dan In Real Life and Love Actually. It’s the kind of story that speaks of life’s little challenges: growing old and following your dreams while also valuing family time. These challenges are embodied in Robert De Niro’s Ben Whittaker and Anne Hathaway’s Jules Ostin.

What’s most compelling about this movie is when Jules and Ben start working together. There’s a bit of time where the writers establish a reluctance on Jules’s part to accept Ben’s wisdom and help, mainly due to his age. Eventually it does happen, though. Ben and Jules find respect and friendship in each other. Ben finds his drive again and Jules finds a way to love her business, but be less stressed.

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Ben finds his way into the hearts of all his colleagues. They benefit from his wisdom in various ways, whether it be de-stressing Jules or teaching the other interns a classy way to dress. The theme I picked up with this movie is to respect all walks of life and help others. You never know where help will come from, and with whom.